Sumter County Record Journal



G’ville Mayor reverses decision to ‘add to circus’

Carrie Fulghum alleges racial bias in paying vendors, will not swear in Thad

18 wheeler flips over rail, driver lives

SC Record Journal braces for tariff tax impact

SCS&W recognizes Granec’s service

UWA ‘hits home run’ with new hire

Former Coach Bobby Wallace is Athletic Director

Public Hearing smiles show no opposition to new grocery store

 

 

Click on the Black Warrior River Keeper letter to download a readable .pdf of the entire letter

18 Wheeler goes over bridge into creek

State troopers are investigating a three vehicle accident involving three 18 wheelers at the 25 mile marker on Interstate 20/59 in Sumter County, Aug. 3.
No serious injuries were reported by first responders arriving at the scene.
The wreck occurred at about 8:15 a.m. Friday morning, August 3.
The wreck occurred in the north bound lane and traffic may be halted for a short time while wrecker crews remove the vehicles.
One tractor trailer went over a bridge railing and fell about 100 feet into a creek. The driver crawled out of the smashed cab and was sitting on the top of the bank when rescuers arrived. The driver was later transfered to a local hospital by ambulance.
Troopers are investigating and a full report will be in the Sumter County Record Journal August 9 issue.
Video and story by Tommy McGraw, Publisher.

Click on the smiling young lady above to see the Market and a Movie Gallery


Click on the artists above to see the York Hightower Summer Reading Program photo gallery

Holiday Deadlines:
Labor Day deadline Friday, Aug. 31 before noon.
Thanksgiving deadline Monday, Nov. 19 before noon.
Santa Letters are due Friday, Dec. 7th.
Christmas Edition deadline is Monday, Dec. 17th.
Dec. 27 edition (last paper of the year/New Year’s edition) is Fri., Dec. 21 before noon. We will be closed Dec. 22-26.
Jan. 3rd Edition deadline is Fri., Dec. 28 before noon. We will be closed Dec. 29- Jan. 1.

 

4th annual Sucarnochee Folklife Festival
Video by Kasey DeCastra, Sumter County Record Journal & Moundville Times Community News Editor


 

Visitors explore, grow and connect at the Sucarnochee Folklife Festival
UWA’s SGA sparks Livingston Alive Project

ADEM Meeting 1-11-18
Full ADEM Meeting from Jan. 11, 2018.

Escapee captured after West Alabama manhunt

Click here to Read the story and watch the videos


Chamber partners with IMC students to produce videos
Dr. Tina Jones’ Advanced Media Writing class in the Integrated Marketing Program produced two Sumter County promotional videos as a class project for the Sumter County Chamber of Commerce. The purpose of the videos is to promote and market Sumter County for tourism, outdoor recreation, economic development, and the University. “Come dig into our roots and discover yourself!” Produced by: BreAnna Johnson, Brianna Farley, and Paige Miller at Studio96productions


Chamber partners with IMC students to produce videos
Dr. Tina Jones’ Advanced Media Writing class in the Integrated Marketing Program produced two Sumter County promotional videos as a class project for the Sumter County Chamber of Commerce. The purpose of the videos is to promote and market Sumter County for tourism, outdoor recreation, economic development, and the University. “Come dig into our roots and discover yourself!” Produced by: Sarah Neill, Riley Thompson, and Andrea Burroughs at Studio96productions

Deadlines are Mondays at noon except for Holidays and Wedding/Engagement announcements. Wedding/Engagement announcements are due Fridays before by noon.

http://www.recordjournal.net/home/market-place/

Click on the Market Place ad above to read this all of week’s deals

 

Your local newspaper: The real deal

By Jim Zachary
While no one should ever say “I know it’s real because I saw it on the internet,” everyone should be able to say, “I know it’s real. I read it in the newspaper.” Real newspapers reporting real news have never been more important or more valuable to readers and communities. This week, newspapers across the nation recognize National Newspaper Week and the theme — Real Newspapers…Real News — points to the importance of accurate reporting, watchdog journalism, strong editorials, comprehensive public notices and a free, open public forum that can be easily accessed by readers in more ways than ever before. In print, on digital sites, via laptop, desktop and mobile devices, through SMS or social media, newspapers across the nation continue to be the leading source of reliable information in all the communities they serve. In a world of fake news spread on social media and attacks on the media from people in power, it is important for the public to know the difference between legitimate reporting by credible sources and all the noise posing as “the media.” Here are some of the reasons your local newspaper is the most trustworthy source for news and information: — Newspaper newsrooms are staffed with real people — people you know — reporters, photographers, editors — gathering the news, conducting interviews, covering meetings, attending events, writing, editing, fact-checking and making sure every day you can trust what you read. — Newspapers rely on recognizable sources. Quotes in the articles you read are attributed to real people and can be easily verified. — Newspapers work hard to stay away from single source reporting, giving readers context and balance. — Newspaper websites have legitimate URLs ending in .com or .org extensions, listing contact information, the names of staff members and the media organization’s leadership team on the website. — Newspapers correct mistakes. Everyone makes mistakes at times, but there is a big difference between an error and intentionally and knowingly publishing a false report because of some political or social agenda. Spurious websites, blogs and social media do not correct errors. They thrive on them. In the United States newspapers have a long and important legacy of holding the powerful accountable, defending the First Amendment and advocating for government transparency. Democracy is protected when the newspaper provides checks and balances as the Fourth Estate of government from city hall to the courthouse to the statehouse to the White House. Newspapers are committed to the neighborhoods, cities, counties, states and coverage areas they serve. Straightforward news reporting and thought-provoking commentary give a voice to the voiceless and empower the powerless. Newspapers hold government accountable because at our very core we believe that government belongs to the governed and not to the governing. Don’t be embarrassed because you shared some sensational, agenda-driven report on social media only to find out it is totally fake. Get your news where real news has always been found: Your local newspaper, the real deal. Jim Zachary, CNHI Regional Editor for Georgia and Florida newspapers, is the president and chairman of the Red & Black Publishing Co., serving the University of Georgia, director of the Transparency Project of Georgia, open government trainer and member of the board of directors of the Georgia First Amendment Foundation and a member of the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communications Board of Trust.